Mentor Texts with Allison Marchetti and Rebekah O’Dell

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Episode #83 of the Talks with Teachers podcast

Allison Marchetti  (Co-Founder of Moving Writers) currently teaches English 8 and Reading Writing Workshop 9 at Trinity Episcopal School in Richmond, Virginia. Previously, she taught English 9, 10, Creative Writing, and AP Language at James River High School in Midlothian, Virginia. Allison earned her B.A. in English with a Poetry Writing Emphasis and her Master of Teaching from the University of Virginia. Allison is a professional development provider with Heinemann PD.  You can connect with her via email atallisonmarchetti@trinityes.org or Twitter @allisonmarchett.

Rebekah O’Dell (Co-Founder of Moving Writerscurrently teaches Reading Writing Workshop 9 and 12th gradeView More: http://capture-weddings.pass.us/rockingauthorsInternational Baccalaureate students at Trinity Episcopal School in Richmond, Virginia.  Rebekah previously taught English 9-12 at Atlee High School in Hanover County, Virginia. As a member of Virginia Commonwealth University’s clinical faculty, Rebekah also has extensive experience teaching and mentoring pre-service teachers. Rebekah earned her B.A. in English and  her Master of Teaching from the University of Virginia. Rebekah is a professional development provider with Heinemann PD. You can connect with her via email at rebekahodell@trinityes.org or Twitter @RebekahOdell1.

In this episode you will learn:

  •  How Allison and Rebekah define the term mentor text

  • Why there was a need in the curriculum to create a mentor text unit

  • Where you can go online to find good mentor texts

  • What is the first step you should take to develop a mentor text unit

  • What students gain from using mentor texts

  • How Rebekah and Allison developed their book, Writing with Mentors

mentor texts

If you enjoy the interview, I highly recommend Writing with Mentors: How to Reach Every Writer in the Room

  • Amanda Knox

    “Courage is born out of desperate circumstances.” This is absolutely true. I love that creativity in teaching writing is being born out of pressure, much like the real-life writing process.
    Also, I like your idea of having students write a style first, then showing them a mentor text and having them revise after seeing the example. It is great that you show them what real writers do! Writers do exist in the world in such a variety of content, that almost every student can connect with this in real life! I’m so encouraged to know that I have access to resources such as yours that match my personal/professional goals with writing.